Facade

Facade (Masks) 3_CorinneHansen.jpg


For this one part mold I decided to create a series of masks based off death gods. Masks are typically used for ceremonies, entertainment or are meant to conceal something. I wanted the masks to function in all three of these categories. I began formulating and idea to use them as a wall installation for a ceremony. I also made a combined piece of all three masks that could be worn for ritual or entertainment. Also, part of the reason for choosing death gods was that I personally like to focus on light and radiance, and it was a way for me to cover some of that light to bring balance. I was somewhat inspired of Venetian masks and the decorative spirals on them. I chose three masks as most god myths tend to be seen in trinities. The masks were meant to represent different cultural views of death gods.

Hades was the ancient Greek god of the underworld, god of the dead, was a fearsome figure to those still living; in no hurry to meet him, they were reluctant to swear oaths in his name, and averted their faces when sacrificing to him. Since to many, simply to say the word "Hades" was frightening.

Mictlantecuhtli in Aztec mythology, was a god of the dead and the king of Mictlan, the lowest and northernmost section of the underworld. The worship of Mictlantecuhtli sometimes involved ritual cannibalism, with human flesh being consumed in and around the temple. He and his wife, Mictecacihuatl, watch over the bones of the dead together.

Anubis is the Greek name for a jackal-headed god associated with mummification and the afterlife in ancient Egyptian religion. According to the Akkadian transcription in the Amarna letters, Anubis' name was vocalized in Egyptian as Anapa. The oldest known mention of Anubis is in the Old Kingdom pyramid texts, where he is associated with the burial of the pharaoh. At this time, Anubis was the most important god of the dead but he was replaced during the Middle Kingdom by Osiris.

Mythopoeia, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA. 2013